Catholic Robinson Curriculum: Updates on What We Do

Question:

I have a question about the math. One of you said one hour, the other said  two. Both of those seem like a lot of time. My kids that are doing teaching textbooks don’t take that long, even for a couple of lessons. My algebra  student definitely takes an hour. But for the TT kids, would I then make
them do drills or extra problems, or is it sufficient for them to finish a  lesson or two?

The hour of writing confuses me too. Can you give me examples of what they  are doing each day, and at what ages?  Thanks!
Molly
Mrs. Treasures writes:

Molly,
MATH:

It is strictly 2 hours to gain maximum benefit out of Saxon Math with a 5% error rate unless the child is mathematically gifted. It is not easy, the child
cannot speed up or else they risk making errors. You cannot just do evens or odds. My ADD kids are very distracted (duh), thus they are prone to be very
very careless and discouraged. Literally, took me 10 months for them to get to what is the goal (5% error rate). Some have to do the book twice because they
cheated in the first round but it caught up with them and errors just started rising. Also, had to do a “5 problems and then re-check” method. They tried
everything to get around the system… but I remained steadfast ( listened to interview of Dr. Robinson with Saxon). Another kid had to do the lessons twice
each day just to get to the 5% error rate. This kid became a great example to her siblings about working towards a goal and working hard at it. SHe is
getting zero error for the past weeks (she used to get 6 or more). It is like  “math skills- endurance, strengthening, mastery, confidence building exercise”.
For me, like training your brain to work at math for 2 solid hours.

8 year old ds – Saxon 5/4 (second round)
10 year old ds – Saxon 6/5
12 year old ds- Saxon 7/6 (second round)
14 year old dd- Saxon 8/7
16 year old dd- Saxon Algebra 1/2 (second round)
16 year old boy ds- Saxon Precalculus
17 year old boy ds – Saxon Algebra 1

ESSAY

THe goal is to let them express themselves freely until it is second nature to them. If they need a prompt, I give them but the older kids are doing it on
their own. It must be handwritten.

8 year old ds – copy work (one page)
10 year old ds – writes a “Dear God” journal (averages 3 notebook pages, )
12 year old ds- writes factual stuff and what he thinks about it (averages 3 pages)
14 year old dd- writes from the heart (averages 2 pages)
16 year old dd- waits for a writing prompt from me (averages 3-4 pages)
16 year old boy ds- writes on any topic (mastered grammar, coherence, style, 5
paragraph essay, can write at will) (targets one page 5 paragraph essay,typewritten)
17 year old boy ds – writes theological stuff (averages 3 pages)

They are not naturally good spellers so I underline in red spelling errors. They revise. If they see a blue underline it means I want them to get a more
appropriate word (to encourage them to use big words). Grammatical errors are scarce and not annoying. I let go until I see they commit it too often. Seldom
happens and eventually it self-corrects Coherence evolves naturally. Style too.

READING

Started them with Robinson books, but they are liking ANGELICUM Academy Great books/Kolbe and SETON book lists for high school. We do not stop to do critical analysis. I just let them read one book after another. Some of them used what they read as writing prompts.

Vocabulary, Grammar, Spelling – nothing formal… just as a product of what they are reading but I can tell you it is improving.

History is in the book list as (living history, biographies)

Science is after calculus though my kids are free to get a college level science book anytime or read about it.

I have Encyclopedia Britannica and Book of Knowledge which they must read to get information on the author, or whatever interesting comes out of their reading.

Foreign Language – not included but after the mandatory 6 hours, they grab a college level book to teach themselves.

Catholic books (1 hour) – i used the book list of Catholic homeschool providers

CHILDREN UNDER 8 YEARS OLD (no formal studies except phonics and math facts)

PLAY (majority)
Phonics
Math – math facts

God Bless,
Joy

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